The Parting Glass • Faulkner Group
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The Parting Glass

This comes from the late 1600’s or early 1700’s, a Scottish celebration of friendship sung as dear friends depart after a gathering for the sometimes long journey home. A “glass” offered, one final drink to fortify for the journey home.
 
Hold those you love dear. Part with fondness and affection, with sincerity as the journey, like life, is long and uncertain.
 
“Of all the money that e’er I had
I’ve spent it in good company
And all the harm that e’er I’ve done
Alas it was to none but me
And all I’ve done for want of wit
To memory now I can’t recall
So fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all
 
Of all the comrades that e’er I had
They are sorry for my going away
And all the sweethearts that e’er I had
They would wish me one more day to stay
But since it falls unto my lot
That I should rise and you should not
I’ll gently rise and I’ll softly call
Good night and joy be with you all
 
A man may drink and not be drunk
A man may fight and not be slain
A man may court a pretty girl
And perhaps be welcomed back again
But since it has so ought to be
By a time to rise and a time to fall
Come fill to me the parting glass
Good night and joy be with you all
Good night and joy be with you all”
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